Totalitarian Dystopia: 1) Harvard Crimson, pull critical story of Harvard & Thai junta

The Harvard Crimson, the USA’s oldest continuously published daily college newspaper, founded in 1873 and incorporated in 1967, had pulled a report critical of the Thai junta. The report is about the Thai junta raising funds for a Thai Study Center at Harvard University, called by the junta, a beach-head. (Up-Dated) Harvard Crimson re-posted the report after the writer left Thailand (end).

From the Wikipedia:

Orwellian describes a totalitarian dystopia characterised by government control and subjugation of the people. Orwell’s invented language, Newspeak, satirises hypocrisy and evasion by the state: for example, the Ministry of Love (Miniluv) oversees torture and brainwashing, the Ministry of Plenty (Miniplenty) oversees shortage and famine, the Ministry of Peace (Minipax) oversees war and atrocity, and the 

Ministry of Truth (Minitrue) oversees propaganda and historical revisionism.

The following is a statement from Harvard Crimson:

Troubles with Thai Studies

Editors’ Note: The article that previously appeared at this URL has been temporarily removed due to concerns about the personal safety of its author. The Crimson regrets having to take this action, which is in most cases in violation of our policies, but found the reasons for doing so overwhelming in this case. We expect to be able repost the article’s original text, at this URL, in the near future.

—Brian L. Cronin and Anja C. Nilsson, Editorial Chairs

—Samuel Y. Weinstock, President

 About Harvard Crimson:

The Harvard Crimson is the only breakfast-table daily newspaper in Cambridge, Mass. The Crimson publishes every morning, Monday through Friday, except on federal and University holidays. In addition to the daily newspaper, The Crimson publishes an arts section on Tuesdays and Fifteen Minutes, the weekend magazine of The Crimson, on Thursdays. Our presses are also available for third-party contract printing. Call (617) 576-6600 for more information.

History of The Crimson

The Harvard Crimson, the nation’s oldest continuously published daily college newspaper, was founded in 1873 and incorporated in 1967. The newspaper traces its history to the first issue of “The Magenta,” published on Jan. 24, 1873, and changed its name to “The Crimson” to reflect the new color of the college on May 21, 1875. The Crimson has a rich tradition of journalistic integrity and counts among its ranks of editorship some of America’s greatest journalists. The faces of Pulitzer Prize-winning Crimson editors line the walls of The Crimson.

The Crimson is proud of its legacy of alumni active in journalism, business, public service, and politics. Past editors include Franklin D. Roosevelt, Class of 1904, John F. Kennedy ’40, J. Anthony Lewis ’48, David Halberstam ’55, Michael Crichton ’64, Don Graham ’65, Linda Greenhouse ’68, Steve Ballmer ’77, Jim Cramer ’77, Mark Whitaker ’79, Susan Chira ’80, and Jeff Zucker ’86. One hundred and forty years after its founding, having grown from a fortnightly newspaper to a daily, The Harvard Crimson continues to flourish with a strong body of undergraduate staff volunteers.

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s